Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 6:00pm
Online

Please join them by Zoom, Passcode: 064017

This talk explores a diverse array of visual and material culture, including paintings, sculptures, textiles, liturgical objects, and even quipus (mnemonic devices consisting of knotted cords) in the forging of an anticolonial consciousness in the eighteenth-century Andes. Conversely, it also explores artistic patronage and production in the repressive post-rebellion era, looking specifically at the means by which official portraiture, cartography, and religious paintings sought to erase and reconfigure social memory of these upheavals in their aftermath. An attention to visual and material culture sheds light on a multiplicity of responses to rebellion by artists, viewers, and patrons who may not otherwise appear in the documentary record. Through interdisciplinary investigation that brings into conversation select works of art with the vast legal paper trail left behind by the age of rebellions, this talk offers new perspectives on the ways historical actors harnessed the visual world as an agent of political transformation.